Walking With the Elephants

 

I’m Damian Brasher, the author of this ebook. I’ve worked for over 12 years as a Linux systems administrator – spanning different sectors. I’ve also programmed using open source environments for over 11 years.

It is difficult to describe the collaborative development process and the resulting benefits. It is difficult to describe how open source is often developed. It is hard to talk about a technical subject matter and inspire non-technical people, at the same time. The expense of developing open material, including code, is often perceived as costly.

Open source software users are often unaware of the licence and business models powering great applications and their worlds. The wonderful collaborative nature of open source development offers inspiration and ideas to everyone in this new and exciting age of connectivity. With the wrong steer, high development costs can render targets unreachable.

This ebook is here so I can share with you, my experience of the open source world. Give you ideas, insight and inspiration. Although the ebook uses open source as a key, the message has been arranged to be generic to other small scale collaborations and developments. I talk about my experience whilst using essential social networking tools. I hope to save you money too.

I’ve been busy developing and collaborating to create DIASER – an open source long term archiving and disaster recovery system, during the past six years. In July 2011 the software successfully passed the Fedora project quality assurance process and is now available as an official update to the Fedora operating system. I’m a member of Mensa and the BCS The Chartered Institute for IT. I’m also used to working with tight budgets.

Excerpt: “The two meetings were essential to a successful funding proposal and ultimately a smooth collaboration. We established boundaries and gained a solid understanding of where our development interests lay. There was no conflict and our two areas of development were a stage apart. I believe these meetings smoothed the pathway to collaboration significantly and some useful ideas were exchanged.

You can buy from Amazon for Kindle £1.71 or to request a colour PDF copy use contact@walkingwiththeelephants.co.uk and I will send you PayPal payment details and email you a copy £3.49.

 

Bonus free ebook “Damian’s Social Networking Rule Book” Social networking without the need for time travel… A free, public domain ebook. Download now!

 

WWTE Contents
1 Introduction
2 Share the idea I
3 Broadcast the idea I
4 Develop the idea
5 Create a prototype
6 Intellectual property
7 Share the idea II
8 Better prototype
9 Further funding
10 Release early release often
11 Communication is everything
12 Keeping it manageable
13 Broadcast the idea II
14 Tidy as you go
15 Measuring success
16 Share the idea III
17 Make luck, right place right time

Chapters 1 and 2 for free review

Chapters 1 and 2 free for review

 

 

Damian has over 12 years experience as a Linux systems administrator spanning different sectors. He is a member of Mensa and the BCS The Chartered Institute for IT. He has programmed in a Linux environment for 11 years. This ebook draws from experience whilst developing DIASER – a long term archiving and disaster recovery system. In July 2011 the software successfully passed the Fedora project quality assurance process and is now available as an official update to the Fedora operating system.

 

Coincidentally, Mark Webbink, former general counsel of Red Hat, Inc. and presently a visiting professor of law at New York Law School, has written extensively about open source software licensing, working another sort of (legal IT) elephant; Walking With Elephants

 

 

 

Please post comments to this site or send an email to: contact@walkingwiththeelephants.co.uk

 

Reviews and feedback…

 

“Having just finished reading Walking With The Elephants, I am recommend it to anyone who is working on, or considering working on a small scale open source project.  I currently work on a small distro, doing the majority of the work on my own and I found myself nodding and agreeing in several places.  As well as finding that I have completed some of the same processes that the author did, it was interesting to see what may lay ahead, and finding what pitfalls have been encountered.  I also found that the tone of the book was friendly, just the right side of informal, and unlike some books in this genre, not at all dry.  All in all, I really enjoyed this book, and for someone like myself with a short attention span to sit and read the book in one sitting is quite something.

 

David Purse – Lead developer of Simplicity Linux